The information below relates to Summer Quarter 2018. Details about Summer Quarter 2019 will be available in early February. To get the latest Summer Quarter news, sign up for email updates.

Online Courses

UW Summer Quarter offers a select number of courses that can be taken completely online. These are regular credit courses taught by UW faculty and follow the same academic schedule as other Summer Quarter courses.

Course formats and technology requirements vary. To learn more about an individual course, click on the links below the description to view it in the UW Time Schedule or in MyPlan (which requires a login).

For information on registering for these and other courses, see the How to Register page.

Arts & Language

ART H 270: Art/Identity Politics: Issues of Representations in Contemporary Art

Learn about the various ways contemporary artists and art movements have explored the intersection of visual representation, identity formation and politics, one of the most persistent themes in art since the 1960s.

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DANCE 101: Dance & the American Experience

Investigate shared, conflicting and shifting notions of the American experience as expressed in 20th- and 21st-century American dance. Investigate real, imagined and idealized portrayals of the American experience as enacted on the concert stage, in film and on television. Engage in critical discourse on issues of identity in American society.

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DRAMA 103: Theatre Appreciation

Explore the art of live theatrical performance. Discuss how theatre is assembled, who the artists are, what they do, how theatre differs from other media and how the various genres and styles of performance function to create a deeper understanding of live performance.

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JSIS E 134: Intensive Elementary Modern Greek

Learn the fundamentals of oral and written modern Greek.

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MUSIC 162: American Popular Song

Undertake a historical, social and stylistic study of popular idioms from the late 19th century to the present. Focus primarily on contemporary idioms (rock, country-western, soul, hip-hop). Examine various facets of the industry to learn how they influence taste and musical style.

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SCAND 270: Sagas of the Vikings

The medieval literary treasure known collectively as the Icelandic Family Sagas offers its readers a stunning and strange view of a time gone by, when Viking raids were righteous proof of cunning and some of the toughest warriors composed brilliant poetry on the spot. The Family Saga is typically set in rural Iceland and thus portrays ordinary people rather than court culture of its contemporary, European Romance. In the 10 representative sagas we read in the course a variety of subject areas come to the fore, ranging through biography, feud and justice system, pagan-Christian conversion and Viking exploration.

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SCAND 330: Scandinavian Mythology

Conduct an integrative study of religious life in the pre-Christian North. The emphasis is on source materials, including the Prose Edda and Poetic Edda. Discuss historical, archeological and folkloric evidence.

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T ARTS 120: Music Appreciation

This course will provide students with an introduction to Western art music from the following periods: Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Modern and Postmodern. Develop listening skills as the vehicle through which specific musical concepts are examined. Explore analytical and critical tools to develop a historically informed appreciation of this tradition.

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T LIT 101: Understanding Literature

Develop essential tools for close and informed reading of fiction, drama and poetry. Consider how a text generates aesthetic pleasure and how it achieves moral or social impact. Develop skills in literary analysis through reading literary texts, discussion and critical writing.

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TSPAN 101: Elementary Spanish

This course has no description in the course catalog. Please contact the department for more details.

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TSPAN 102: Elementary Spanish

This course continues TSPAN 101. It stresses a communicative approach to language.

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TWRT 200: Introduction to Creative Writing

Get an introduction to several genres and explore the creative writing process and terminology of imaginative expression.

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History & Social Sciences

HTSTAM 101: The Ancient World

Examine the origins of Western civilization, all the way through the fall of Rome.

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HSTCMP 205: Filipino Histories

What is the relationship between colonialism and nationalism, between politics and religion, and between language and society? This question guides a survey of the histories, cultures and politics of Filipinos and the Philippines. Topics include pre-colonial societies; Spanish and U.S. colonial rule; the rise of nationalism; the Revolution and the First Republic; the Filipino-American war; the Japanese occupation; the postcolonial period leading up to martial law; the recurrence of peasant, communist and Muslim rebellions; the beginnings of the Filipino diaspora; and the persistence of elite rule amid changing conditions of neo-colonialism and postcolonial globalization.

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POL S 321: American Foreign Policy

Investigate concepts such as the constitutional framework; major factors in formulation and execution of policy; policies modified by recent developments; and the principal policymakers — the president, Congress, political parties, pressure groups and public opinion.

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PSYCH 101: Introduction to Psychology

This course surveys the major areas of psychological science. Explore areas such as human social behavior, personality, psychological disorders and treatment, learning, memory, human development, biological influences and research methods. Other topics may include sensation, perception, states of consciousness, thinking, intelligence, language, motivation, emotion, stress and health, cross-cultural psychology and applied psychology.

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T COM 312: Ecology, Inequality & Popular Culture

Survey the debates within cultural and critical studies to explore how portrayals of ecology in popular culture directly relate to representations of gender, sexuality, nationality, ethnicity and class. Apply numerous critical perspectives to understand key power structures in film, television, magazines and novels from the United States and international sources.

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T CRIM 272: Restorative Justice

Explore the philosophical underpinnings of restorative justice as well as its application as a complementary and alternative approach to criminal justice processing. Analyze the effectiveness of restorative justice for resolving harm through directly engaging victims, offenders and communities.

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T HIST 150: World History: Prehistory to 1500

Survey the social, political, economic and cultural history of the world from Prehistory to the 15th century. Course cannot be taken if you have already taken TCXG 230.

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T HIST 151: World History II: 1500 to Present

Survey the social, political, economic and cultural history of the world from the end of the 15th century to the present.

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T HIST 260: Empires & Imperialism in World History

Examine the history of the Roman, Chinese, Mongol, Ottoman and Modern European empires along with imperialism from ancient to modern times. Topics include empire as historical pattern related to political, economics, and cultural spheres of influence and exchange.

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T HIST 466: Modern Korea

Trace Korea's transition from traditional Asian state to modern nation emerging on the world economic scene. Explore how, because of its geographic location, Korea has suffered chaotic change in the modern period. Examine Korean society, culture, and politics, looking at Korea's time as a Japanese colony, the division of Korea, the Korean War and recent developments.

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T LAW 424: The Politics & Law of International Human Rights

Study the international human rights movement in its legal and political context, with a focus on institutions which influence, enable and constrain the international promotion of human rights.

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T LAX 376: Latin American Film

Examine the ways in which Latin American film reflects history, society, class and gender issues. Develop an understanding of film as an art form within a specific formal cultural context. The films shown in class are in Spanish or Portuguese with English subtitles; no knowledge of Spanish is required.

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TPSYCH 202: Human Sexuality

Survey the biological, psychological and social determinants of human sexuality and sexual behavior. The topics covered include cultural diversity, sexual development (physical and psychological), sexual health, reproduction (pregnancy, contraception, abortion), development of sex, gender orientation, adult sexual bonding, sexual abuse and assault.

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TPSYCH 349: Sexual Identities

Explore the lives and current issues facing lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) persons, with particular attention to developmental, community and political issues and their intersections. The course emphasizes current areas of consensus and discord among members within, across and outside these communities.

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TRELIG 105: Introduction to Religious Studies

Get an introduction to the “data” — including objects, places, texts, music, and rituals — foundational for the academic study of religion, beginning with a critical discussion of the problem of defining “religion.” It is recommended that students complete this course before taking TRELIG 210 and TRELIG 321.

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TRELIG 350: Philosophy, Religion, & the Environment

Examine the value of nature and whether it is socially constructed or objectively existing. Consider how our philosophical and religious worldviews affect the way we value ourselves and our environment — including perspective from diverse traditions.

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T SOC 455: The Sociology of Gender

Explore biological and social bases of gender differences; ways in which changing social definitions of womanhood and manhood affect self-perceptions, opportunities and behaviors. Examine social movements and theories that challenge traditional roles of men and women in U.S. society, and those which question the benefits of liberation.

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T SOCWF 351: Applied Statistics for Social & Human Sciences

Apply statistical methods that are used in social and human services. Examine the purpose and use of social statistics, including the study of relationships between variables as a tool for conducting research; central tendencies and dispersion; probability; descriptive statistics, statistical inference and hypothesis testing; and bivariate analysis.

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T SOCWF/T CRIM 363: The Criminalization of Immigration

Examine the criminalization of immigration in the United States and globally, and the ways in which social institutions have implemented immigration policies. Analyze the unintended consequences of criminalizing policies and practices. Explore psychosocial effects on the lives of diverse immigrants, their families and ethnic minority communities.

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T SUD 222: Introduction to Sustainability

This course provides an introduction to the global goal of sustainability and surveys policies and techniques associated with current sustainability initiatives in diverse metropolitan environments. It includes a discussion of scientific debates; conflicts within and between societies at different levels of economic development; key policy arenas for action; and common methods used to further sustainability values.

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T URB 225: Statistics for Urban Analysis

This course offers an introduction to basic methods of both descriptive and inferential statistical analysis, and applies them to topics common to the field of urban planning and community development. It develops a critical perspective on how such methods relate to public discourse and urban policymaking.

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T WOMN 101: Introduction to Women's Studies

Survey the roles and status of women in the United States; the process of gender socialization; the intersection of gender with identities such as race, class, and sexual orientation; the history and experience of women; and feminist theory and practice.

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T WOMN 205: Introduction to Masculinities

Examine the key concepts of masculinities studies, analyze the roles that men adopt and explore how these roles are implicated in the development of male identity. The course also explores the diversity of masculinities within American society.

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Math & Science

ASTR 101: Astronomy

Introduction to the universe, with emphasis on conceptual, as contrasted with mathematical, comprehension. Modern theories, observations; ideas concerning nature, evolution of galaxies; quasars, stars, black holes, planets, solar system. Course cannot be taken for credit if you have already taken ASTR 102 or ASTR 301; not open to upper-division students majoring in physical sciences or engineering.

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ASTR 150: The Planets

Survey the planets of the solar system, with emphasis on recent space exploration of the planets and on the comparative evolution of the Earth and the other planets.

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ESRM 100: Introduction to Environmental Science

Examine the importance of the environment in society, with particular emphasis on worldwide distribution and uses of resources, the role of natural and man-made environments and causes of environmental degradation. Learn about the ethics of conservation and recycling. Course cannot be taken for credit if you have already taken ESC 110.

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STAT 311: Elements of Statistical Methods

Examine elementary concepts of probability and sampling; binomial and normal distributions; basic concepts of hypothesis testing, estimation and confidence intervals; t-tests and chi-square tests; linear regression theory; and the analysis of variance. You may receive credit for only one course out of these courses: STAT 220, STAT 221, STAT 311 and ECON 311. Course has a prerequisite of one of the following: MATH 111, MATH 120, MATH 124, MATH 127 or MATH 144.

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T BIOL 306: Animal Behavior

Investigate scientific approaches to animal behavior, emphasizing behavioral measures and experimental designs. Explore the psychological, physiological, developmental and evolutionary principles that guide the study of animal perception, communication, foraging, and sexual and social behavior. Consider applications to animal conservation and welfare, and human decision making. Cannot be taken for credit if you have taken TESC 306.

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T CHEM 245: Chemistry Through History

Examine the discovery and development of natural and man-made chemicals processes that has shaped history and impacted society and the environment. Connect chemistry with other scientific discoveries, as well as linking to other academic disciplines such as politics, social science and art.

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TESC 102: Aquatic Ecosystems in Urban Areas

Get an introduction to the ways in which urban water bodies are impacted by adjacent land users. Explore sustainable development practices that target some of these environmental concerns.

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T MATH 110: Introductory Statistics With Applications

Address the introductory statistical concepts and analysis in modern society. The course includes descriptive statistics, graphical displays of data, the normal distribution, data collection, probability, elements of statistical inference, hypothesis testing, and linear regression and correlation. Practical examples are used to demonstrate statistical concepts.

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T MATH 115: Pre-Calculus I: Functions

This course introduces the concept of a function and its notation, and prepares you to work with piece-wise, exponential, logarithmic, polynomial and rational functions. It emphasizes computational skills, graph reading and problem solving. This is one of a two-part series; a maximum of 10 credits from TMATH 115, TMATH 116 and TMATH 120 may be counted.

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